Rotary’s commitment to saving mothers and babies

Rotary Service Connections | English

By Azka Asif, Rotary Programs Staff

Everyone everywhere has the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. However, gender-based discrimination often undercuts this right. It causes women to be more susceptible to sickness and less likely to obtain care, for reasons ranging from affordability to social conventions keeping them at home. *

Through projects focused in maternal and child health, Rotary members are committed to reaching United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.

A mother and her daughter hang out outside the classrooms at Rancho Alegre schools in California, USA.Each year, at least seven million children under the age of five die from diseases, malnutrition, poor health care, and inadequate sanitation. To help reduce this rate, Rotary members provide immunizations and antibiotics to babies, improve access to essential medical services, and support trained health care providers for mothers and their children. Nearly 80% of maternal deaths can be prevented with access to…

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The key to a successful multi-generational Rotary club

Youth is not a number, it is a state of mind….Effective clubs are clubs that find a way to blend the knowledge and experience of older members with the strength and drive of younger members. This is the greatest challenge facing Rotary as an organization, and the success of any club depends on how well they do this

Rotary Voices

Emmanuel Rey Emmanuel Rey addresses his multi-generational club.

By Emmanuel Rey, a member of the Rotary Club of Villa Devoto, Argentina

In 20 years as a member of the Rotary family, I have learned much. I began my Rotary journey as a member of Interact when I was 12, and six years later moved on to Rotaract. After passing the maximum age of 30 for that program, I proudly became a member of my Rotary club two years ago.

At first, I dreamed of building a big and youthful Rotary club, especially as I observed how hard it was for my fellow Interactors and Rotaractors to bridge the generation gap and become members of Rotary.

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Proud of our Rotary Foundation as told by our Trustee Chair Ray Klinginsmith

When Arch Klumph was president of Rotary in 1916-17, he suggested in a speech at the 1917 Atlanta convention that Rotary should start an endowment fund for the purpose of doing good in the world. It was only a brief reference, but the idea caught on with Rotarians. The Rotary Club of Kansas City, Mo., made the first donation of $26.50 to the new fund, which was officially named The Rotary Foundation in 1928.

The Rotary Foundation had some activity in the 1930s and 1940s, but it was the memorial gifts to honor Paul Harris after his death in January 1947 that provided the funds to undertake the first major program. That was the award of 18 international scholarships for successful college graduates to spend a year studying abroad as Rotary Fellows. The fellowship program grew to 125 students a year in 1960-61, when I was a Rotary Fellow in Cape Town, South Africa, and it later became the largest privately funded scholarship program with 1,200 students a year.

Rotarians’ constant search for the best possible charitable programs led to the introduction of the Matching Grants and Group Study Exchange programs in 1965-66. From there, the Foundation assumed responsibility for the PolioPlus program in the early 1980s, established the Rotary Peace Centers in 2002, and restructured Rotary’s Humanitarian Grants Program as a part of the Future Vision plan in 2013.

What has been the result of these efforts? Rotarians have been justifiably proud and supportive of the Foundation for many years, evidenced by their generous contributions of $123 million to the Annual Fund in 2014-15. In addition, the CNBC television network recently confirmed the success of The Rotary Foundation by naming it one of the “top 10 charities changing the world in 2015.” In fact, our Foundation was ranked as the fifth-best charity working to make the world a better place!

What a powerful tribute to Arch Klumph’s visionary idea in 1917! We have so much to be proud of in Rotary, including The Rotary Foundation, and so much to celebrate at the Atlanta convention next year. Please plan now to attend the centenary celebration at the convention and show your support for one of the very best charitable foundations in the world!

 

Ray Klinginsmith

Trustee Chair 2015 – 16

 

Source: Rotary International

Using the Rotary network to wage peace

Rotary Service Connections | English

By Zuhal Sharp, RI Programs Staff

Rotarian Action Groups (RAGs) are autonomous, internationally organized groups with a passion for and expertise in a specific service area. They provide assistance and support to Rotary clubs and districts in planning and implementing large-scale community development and humanitarian service projects in their respective areas of expertise, such as water, AIDs prevention, microcredit, or hearing.

In honor of February, Peace and Conflict Prevention/Resolution month, learn about the Rotarian Action Group for Peace (RAGFP), a committed group of Rotarians, Rotarians’ spouses, Rotaractors, Rotary Peace Fellows, and other Rotary program alumni dedicated to advancing world peace through education and activities related to conflict prevention and peace building. RAGFP supports and enhances the peace work of Rotarians by offering project guidance and resources. Visit RAGFP’s website and like them on Facebook for the latest updates.

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Related:

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Fostering Ethical Decision Making

We are starting an Rotary Action Group for Ethics. Please share this in your Rotary Networks. Please email me # marilyn@cmi-direct.com and follow us on Facebook.

Rotary Club of Madison, Wisconsin

–submitted by Ben Hebebrand; photos by John Bonsett-Veal and Mike Wenzel

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Almost 250 11th grade students from 20 different Madison area high schools met for the 16th annual Rotary Club of Madison Ethics Symposium on Friday, Feb. 19 at Monona Terrace in Madison, affirming at the culminating luncheon the need not just for adolescents but all of us to “think all the way through decisions.” This kind of thinking, the students expressed, could be enhanced by discussing dilemmas with others including those whom we do not know and those who are different than us.

“Discussing issues with others can broaden your viewpoint,” said Katie Feller of La Follette High School. “It’s interesting to see how people can change their view (by thinking and talking it through),” added Liz Dominguez of Marshall High School.

DSC_0012The five-hour symposium kicked off with real-life reminders that ethical decisions abound throughout history and…

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Is Your Business Ready for the X’ers?

SHaring from the Rotary Club of Madison

Rotary Club of Madison, Wisconsin

–submitted by Donna Hurd; photo b John Bonset-Veal

Seeger DebbieDebbie Seeger, (pictured here with club president Ellsworth Brown) in her presentation entitled “Shift Happens,” provided a futuristic view of the incoming workforce, the ensuing competition to attract and retain talent, and how to prepare for the inevitable.

By the numbers: Baby Boomers represent one of the largest generations in history (78 million) and we are aging.  The succeeding generation, Gen X, represents just over half of the baby boomer population.  Clearly, the laws of supply and demand indicate the supply of available workers will not sufficiently meet the potential demand of employers.  The repercussions of poor planning or absence of planning will prove detrimental to a business’s viability.  Defining the gaps in knowledge with the loss of boomers will be an integral part of assessing the needs of the business in its attempt to successfully move from one generation of…

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